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Abstract : <p>Tobacco smoking is the driving cause of preventable death and diseases worldwide. Graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging are now mandatory in 77 countries to minimize smoking-related deaths. The current study aimed to assess the effect of graphic images (on cigarette packets) on smoking habits among medical students at Tabuk University. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the effect of graphic images on the student behaviour regarding smoking; the study was conducted among 259 medical students in Tabuk University during the period from August to October 2021. A structured web-based questionnaire was used to collect the data. The first part collected demographic data and the second part assessed the effect of graphic images on smoking habits and consisted of eleven Likert scale items (six questions were four items and five had three responses). The Statistical Package for social Sciences was used for data analysis. There were 259 medical students (80.2%) and interns (9.2%), 39.6% were males, and more than a half-heard about tobacco risks the physicians and their families. Cancer images (either specified or not) were the most effective images (48.6%) followed by dead people in 29%. While health concerns were the most common reason (44.1%) for quitting followed by religious reasons in 21.2%. Tobacco images were effective in quitting promotion in 66.1% of students. No differences were evident between males and females regarding the effects of graphic images (26.33&plusmn;6.35 versus 24.91&plusmn;6.81, 95% CI, -0.26-3.09, P-value, 0.099). However, graphic images were more effective on smokers than non-smokers (27.50&plusmn;6.75versus 24.95&plusmn;6.53, 95% CI, -.054-4.55, P-value, 0.099). Tobacco images were effective in quitting promotion, Cancer images were the most effective followed by dead people. While health concerns were the most common reason for quitting.</p>

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